Tag Archives: ankle sprain

High ankle sprain

Summary

  • A high ankle sprain occurs when there is an injury to the large ligament above the ankle that joins together the two bones of the lower leg. Symptoms include pain when the ankle is externally rotated (turned to the outside) or when the calf is squeezed.

How did I get this?

  • A high ankle sprain occurs from a twisting or rotational injury. The high ankle sprain also can occur in the setting of an ankle fracture, which means the bones of the ankle are broken.

What can I do about it?

  • Rest the leg.
  • Ice application for 20 minutes every two to three hours for minimizing inflammation.
  • Gently compress the leg, and elevate the leg with the toes higher than the nose to decrease inflammation.
  • Seek podiatry consultation.

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist for possible immobilization and taping of the ankle for healing.
  • Feet and ankle surgeon for possible surgery if there is a broken bone or widening of bones involved.

When will it get better?

  • The recovery for high ankle sprains can take considerably longer than typical ankle sprains. It usually takes six weeks or more to return to play, but can sometimes take even longer. One good indication that you are ready to go back to sports is if you can hop on the foot 15 times. Surgery will make even more time for recovery and rehabilitation.

Peroneal Tendon Injury

Summary

  • The peroneal tendons are two tendons that lie immediately behind the outside bone of the ankle. These two tendons are responsible for moving the foot outwards. They balance the ankle and the back of the foot and prevent the foot from turning inwards repetitively. These tendons can be injured due to overuse or acute injury. In preoneal tendon injury there is pain behind the ankle, swelling over the tendons, and tenderness of the tendons.

How did I get this?

  • It usually occurs because these tendons are subject to excessive repetitive forces during standing, walking, and running. History of ankle injury (e.g. blow to the ankle or ankle sprain) which can displace the peroneal tendons. Certain foot shapes such as a higher arched foot predispose to the development of injury as well.

What can I do about it?

  • Rest is key, often helped by supportive footwear such as a hiking boot or jogger.
  • Applying ice to the area can help to reduce swelling and help to control pain.
  • Short term use of anti-inflammatories and can reduce the swelling around the tendon.
  • Seek podiatry consultation.

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist for footwear modification, strapping, bracing, orthotics or other measures to reduce stress on the tendons and allow for rest and inflammation to subside.
  • Orthopaedic surgeon for possible surgical repair if there are large tendon tears.

When will it get better?

  • Minor cases of this condition that are identified and treated early can usually settle within a few weeks. Recovery after surgery involves several weeks of restricted weight-bearing and immobilization, depending on the type of surgery performed. Following immobilization, therapy can begin. Total time for recovery is usually 6-12 weeks, depending on the extent of surgery.
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Ankle Sprain

 

Summary

  • An ankle sprain is a condition where there is partial or complete tear of the ligaments of the
    ankle due to sudden stretching. The pain is initially severe and can be associated with a
    “popping” sensation. Immediate swelling over the area of injury often occurs as the injured
    blood vessels leak fluid into the local tissue.

How did I get this?

  • This typically occurs when the ankle is suddenly “twisted” in a sports activity or by stepping off an uneven surface.

What can I do about it?

  • Ice packs.
  • Rest – Limiting the amount of walking and weight bearing on the injured ankle.
  • Elevate to reduce swelling.
  • Apply compression bandage.

What help can I get for this?

  • Seek the advice of a podiatrist for further assessment and strapping, bracing or immobilisation.
  • In case of severe injuries you may need immobilization in a cam walker.
  • Orthopedic surgery if there is complete tear.

When will it get better?

    • Recovery depends on the severity of the injury.
    • For minor injuries, people can usually return to normal activities within several days.
    • For very severe sprains it may take longer, possibly up to several weeks.

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