Tag Archives: corns

Plantar Wart – Verruca

Summary

  • Plantar refers to the sole of your foot (nothing to do with gardening)
  • Wart on the sole of your foot or between your toes
  • May be painful due to a build-up of hard skin

How did I get this?

  • The wart is caused by a virus which thrives in warm moist environments
  • I may have been picked up via a microscopic skin tear
  • They are often contracted through communal barefoot areas such as changing rooms and swimming pools
  • Can also be passed on within families.

What can I do about it?

  • Avoid going barefoot
  • Remedies are available at your pharmacy
  • Use a pumice or foot file to reduce thick hard skin
  • Keep the wart covered with a waterproof dressing or tape
  • Make sure you are generally healthy with a strong immune system

What help can I get for this?

  • A Podiatrist will remove any thick hard skin and advise on treatment options
  • Treatment may involve acid, freezing, burning, or laser to kill the virus causing the wart

When will it get better?

  • Most warts will go away on their own after about 2 years
  • Depending on the type of treatment you should expect an improvement in 6-8 weeks

Hyperkeratosis – Callus – Hard Skin

Summary

  • Painful thick skin (corns and callous) caused by pressure or friction
  • Usually on the sole of your foot or over bony lumps and joints
  • Can become blistered and form a wound if not treated

How did I get this?

  • Pressure or friction causes the skin to thicken
  • Enlarged joints or bony lumps may increase pressure
  • Tight footwear and high heels will increase pressure
  • Loose footwear will increase friction

What can I do about it?

  • Wear properly fitting shoes
  • Use a foam pads to relieve pressure
  • Use thin fleecy pads or moleskin to reduce friction
  • Gently remove excess skin with a pumice or foot file

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist will help by removing the thick skin
  • Podiatrist may provide a pad to relieve pressure or friction
  • Podiatrist can provide pressure relief insoles for your shoes, and may stretch shoes for bony lumps
  • Careful Shoe fitting to ensure room for your toes and secure fit.
  • Orthopaedic surgeon can operate to reduce bony lumps.

    When will it get better?

    • Removing the thick skin often provides immediate relief
    • Padding and insoles can help prevent recurring problems

HAMMER TOE

Summary

  • Hammertoe is a contracture (bending) of one or both joints of the second, third, fourth, or fifth (little) toes when the long muscles originating from the lower leg overpower the smaller muscles in the foot. This abnormal bending can put pressure on the toe when wearing shoes, causing problems to develop such as pain or irritation of the affected toe when wearing shoes, a buildup of skin (on toe, between two toes, or on the ball of the foot), inflammation, redness, or a burning sensation.

How did I get this?

  • Family history, arthritis, trauma, bunions, tight footwear, and neurological conditions such as stroke or peripheral neuropathy.

What can I do about it?

  • New shoes that have soft, roomy toe boxes (should be 1cm longer than your longest toe).
  • Avoid wearing tight, narrow, high-heeled shoes.
  • Find a shoe with a deep toe box that accommodates the hammer toe.
  • Sandals may help, as long as they do not pinch or rub other areas of the foot.

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist may prescribe pads designed to shield corns and calluses from irritation.
  • Podiatrist may prescribe orthotic devices placed in your shoe to help control the muscle/tendon imbalance.
  • Podiatrist may advise splints or small straps to realign the bent toe.
  • Possible surgery when the hammertoe has become more rigid and painful, or when an open sore has developed.

When will it get better?

  • This is a progressive deformity which can only be corrected with surgery. Treatment for the symptoms and appropriate footwear will help to keep you comfortable.
  • After surgery the length of the recovery period will vary, depending on the procedure or procedures performed.