Tag Archives: fracture

Stress Fracture

Summary

  • Stress Fracture occurs when excessive repetitive force is applied to a localized area of bone. Activities such as walking, running, and repeated jumping can subject the bones of the foot to large forces that often lead to microscopic cracks in the bone.

How did I get this?

  • Generally, it is repetitive stress (i.e. running, marching, sport etc.) although some bone diseases can pre-dispose to thin bones which therefore fracture more easily. In people with osteoporosis (thinning of the bone) there is an increased risk of stress fracture.

What can I do about it?

  • Rest the area and stop sporting activity.
  • Wear good fitting shoes with adequate support and cushioning.
  • Avoid high heels.
  • You can try a protective pad.
  • See a podiatrist.

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist may advise appropriate shoes, consider prescribing orthotics, consider immobilisation, and advise on surgery.

When will it get better?

  • In the majority of cases, conservative care allows the bone to heal and normal activity can then be resumed. Surgery is sometimes necessary to stabilise the fracture site which allows longer time to resume activity.

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Posterior Heel Spur

Summary

  • Posterior heel spur occurs where the achilles tendon inserts into the back of the heel bone. If there is excessive pull at the attachment, the area can become painful. In some instances a bone spur can form at the back of the heel. There is pain directly over the bone at the back of the heel.

How did I get this?

  • Overuse particularly in sport. However, bone spurs can take many years to form without being painful.

What can I do about it?

  • Rest.
  • Ice.
  • Heel raises can help.
  • An Achilles heel protector can be of benefit.
  • See a podiatrist.

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist may advise appropriate shoes, stretching, heel raise , and possible guided injection for symptoms control.
  • Orthopaedic surgeon for surgical removal of bone spur.

When will it get better?

  • This can be a very difficult condition to treat and can take several months to settle. Whilst the treatment options can be of benefit, they will not reduce any bone spur. With surgery, it often involves a long recovery (6-12 months).

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Jones Fracture

Summary

  • The Jones fracture is a fairly common fracture of the fifth metatarsal (The long bone connecting your little toe to the rest of the foot).
  • Jones fractures sometimes disrupt blood supply and can result in the permanent failure of a bone to heal.
  • Symptoms include pain, swelling, bruising, severe and pain while walking.

How did I get this?

  • Overuse, repetitive stress, and trauma are the leading causes of Jones fractures. Jones fracture is attributed to a twisting inversion injury to the foot. Inversion injuries happen when the foot or ankle twists inward.

What can I do about it?

  • Rest and stay off the injured foot (walking may cause further injury).
  • Apply an ice pack to the injured area, placing a thin towel between the ice and the skin. Use ice for 20 minutes and then wait at least 40 minutes before icing again.
  • An elastic wrap should be used to control swelling.
  • Elevation of foot should slightly above the level of your heart to reduce swelling.
  • Seek podiatry consultation.

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist may consider immobilization in a cam walker depending on the severity of the injury (crutches may also be needed to avoid placing weight on the injured foot).
  • Foot and ankle surgeon for surgical approach if the injury involves a displaced bone, multiple breaks, or has failed to adequately heal.

When will it get better?

  • In most cases, rehabilitation can begin once the cast is removed, and you will gradually be able to resume your normal activities. Rehabilitation may take an additional two to three weeks. Your age may also play a role in healing time. Younger people are known to heal faster from bone injuries.

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Ankle Sprain

 

Summary

  • An ankle sprain is a condition where there is partial or complete tear of the ligaments of the
    ankle due to sudden stretching. The pain is initially severe and can be associated with a
    “popping” sensation. Immediate swelling over the area of injury often occurs as the injured
    blood vessels leak fluid into the local tissue.

How did I get this?

  • This typically occurs when the ankle is suddenly “twisted” in a sports activity or by stepping off an uneven surface.

What can I do about it?

  • Ice packs.
  • Rest – Limiting the amount of walking and weight bearing on the injured ankle.
  • Elevate to reduce swelling.
  • Apply compression bandage.

What help can I get for this?

  • Seek the advice of a podiatrist for further assessment and strapping, bracing or immobilisation.
  • In case of severe injuries you may need immobilization in a cam walker.
  • Orthopedic surgery if there is complete tear.

When will it get better?

    • Recovery depends on the severity of the injury.
    • For minor injuries, people can usually return to normal activities within several days.
    • For very severe sprains it may take longer, possibly up to several weeks.

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