Tag Archives: pain behind heel

Pump Bump On Back of Heel.

Summary

  • It is a condition where there is bony enlargement on the back of the heel due to irritation if rubs against the shoes. Symptoms include a noticeable bump on the back of the heel, pain in the area where the Achilles tendon attaches to the heel, swelling in the back of the heel, and redness near the inflamed tissue.

How did I get this?

  • Any shoes with a rigid back, such as ice skates, men’s dress shoes, or women’s pumps can cause this irritation.

What can I do about it?

  • Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, may be taken to reduce the pain and inflammation.
  • Apply an ice pack to the inflamed area for reducing the inflammation.
  • Stretching exercises help relieve tension from the Achilles tendon. Heel lifts placed inside the shoe to decrease the pressure on the heel.
  • Heel pads placed inside the back of the shoe to cushion the heel may help reduce irritation when walking.
  • Shoe modification (Backless or soft backed shoes help avoid or minimize irritation).

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist may prescribe orthotics to control the motion in the foot.
  • Foot and ankle surgeon if non-surgical treatment fails to provide adequate pain relief.

When will it get better?

  • Nonsurgical approach control symptoms if treated early but will not shrink the bony protrusion.
  • Surgical recovery time depends greatly on which procedure your surgeon performed.

 

Severs Disease

Summary

  • Severs Disease is a painful inflammation of the heel’s growth plate. It typically affects children between the ages of 8 to 14 years old, because the heel bone is not fully developed until at least age 14. When there is too much repetitive stress on the growth plate, inflammation can develop. Symptoms include pain in the back or bottom of the heel, limping, walking on toes, and difficulty running or jumping.

How did I get this?

  • Overuse and stress on the heel bone through participation in sports is a major cause. The heel’s growth plate is sensitive to repeated running and pounding on hard surfaces, resulting in muscle strain and inflamed tissue. For this reason, children and adolescents involved in soccer/football, running, or basketball are especially vulnerable.

What can I do about it?

  • Rest.
  • Ice pack application.
  • Calf and hamstring stretches.
  • See a podiatrist.

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist will confirm the diagnosis and advise appropriate shoes, exercises, and orthotics.

When will it get better?

  • Use of orthotics and supportive footwear usually provide relief within a few weeks.
  • The condition is self-limiting. Once the growth plate has closed the condition will resolve.

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Retrocalcaneal bursitis

Summary

  • Retrocalcaneal bursitis is a condition characterized by tissue damage and inflammation of the retrocalcaneal bursa (a small fluid filled sac located at the back of the heel) causing heel pain. Risk factors include poor foot biomechanics (particularly flat feet), inappropriate footwear (e.g. excessively tight fitting shoes).  Muscle weakness or tightness (particularly the calf, quadriceps and gluteals), joint stiffness (particularly the ankle or foot), and bony anomalies of the heel bone should be considered. External factors where there is overuse or or a change in conditions or activity are often a factor.

How did I get this?

  • Compressive forces and friction may be placed on the retrocalcaneal bursa during certain ankle movements or by wearing excessively tight shoes. When these forces are excessive due to too much repetition or high force, irritation and inflammation of the bursa may occur.

What can I do about it?

  • Rest.
  • Massaging the calf muscles.
  • Stretching.
  • Ice packs.
  • Seek podiatry consultation.

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist may prescribe padding or strapping, appropriate footwear/modification, exercises, or orthotics
  • Orthopaedic surgeon for surgical removal of bone spur (if present), removing the thickened inflamed retrocalcaneal bursa, and debriding the Achilles tendon.

When will it get better?

  • This condition usually gets better in several weeks with the proper treatment.

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Posterior Heel Spur

Summary

  • Posterior heel spur occurs where the achilles tendon inserts into the back of the heel bone. If there is excessive pull at the attachment, the area can become painful. In some instances a bone spur can form at the back of the heel. There is pain directly over the bone at the back of the heel.

How did I get this?

  • Overuse particularly in sport. However, bone spurs can take many years to form without being painful.

What can I do about it?

  • Rest.
  • Ice.
  • Heel raises can help.
  • An Achilles heel protector can be of benefit.
  • See a podiatrist.

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist may advise appropriate shoes, stretching, heel raise , and possible guided injection for symptoms control.
  • Orthopaedic surgeon for surgical removal of bone spur.

When will it get better?

  • This can be a very difficult condition to treat and can take several months to settle. Whilst the treatment options can be of benefit, they will not reduce any bone spur. With surgery, it often involves a long recovery (6-12 months).

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Peroneal Tendon Injury

Summary

  • The peroneal tendons are two tendons that lie immediately behind the outside bone of the ankle. These two tendons are responsible for moving the foot outwards. They balance the ankle and the back of the foot and prevent the foot from turning inwards repetitively. These tendons can be injured due to overuse or acute injury. In preoneal tendon injury there is pain behind the ankle, swelling over the tendons, and tenderness of the tendons.

How did I get this?

  • It usually occurs because these tendons are subject to excessive repetitive forces during standing, walking, and running. History of ankle injury (e.g. blow to the ankle or ankle sprain) which can displace the peroneal tendons. Certain foot shapes such as a higher arched foot predispose to the development of injury as well.

What can I do about it?

  • Rest is key, often helped by supportive footwear such as a hiking boot or jogger.
  • Applying ice to the area can help to reduce swelling and help to control pain.
  • Short term use of anti-inflammatories and can reduce the swelling around the tendon.
  • Seek podiatry consultation.

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist for footwear modification, strapping, bracing, orthotics or other measures to reduce stress on the tendons and allow for rest and inflammation to subside.
  • Orthopaedic surgeon for possible surgical repair if there are large tendon tears.

When will it get better?

  • Minor cases of this condition that are identified and treated early can usually settle within a few weeks. Recovery after surgery involves several weeks of restricted weight-bearing and immobilization, depending on the type of surgery performed. Following immobilization, therapy can begin. Total time for recovery is usually 6-12 weeks, depending on the extent of surgery.
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OsTrigonum Syndrome

Summary

  • Ostrigonum syndrome refers to pain in the back of the ankle. The Ostrigonum is an extra (accessory) bone that sometimes develops behind the ankle. The presence of an Ostrigonum in one or both feet is congenital (present at birth). It becomes evident during adolescence. Pain in the back of the ankle is the first indicator of Ostrigonum syndrome. The area in front of the Achilles tendon is sore to touch and the bony prominence may even be palpable. The diagnosis can usually be confirmed by x-ray views of the ankle from the side.

How did I get this?

  • Ostrigonum syndrome is usually triggered by an injury, such as an ankle sprain. The syndrome is also frequently caused by repeated downward pointing of the toes, which is common among ballet dancers, soccer players and other athletes.

What can I do about it?

  • Rest to stay off the injured foot to let the inflammation subside.
  • Applying a bag of ice covered with a thin towel to the affected area decreases inflammation process.
  • Short term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, may be helpful in reducing the pain and inflammation.
  • Seek podiatry consultation.

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist may consider immobilization using a walking boot or splint to restrict ankle motion to allow healing.
  • Your doctor may prescribe cortisone injection into the area to reduce the inflammation and pain.
  • Foot and ankle surgeon for possible removal of Ostrigonum.

When will it get better?

  • Most patients’ symptoms improve quickly with non-surgical treatment. However, in some patients, surgery may be required to relieve the symptoms. There is usually persistent swelling and discomfort after the surgery so limiting activities is required until these symptoms settle.

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Ankle Sprain

 

Summary

  • An ankle sprain is a condition where there is partial or complete tear of the ligaments of the
    ankle due to sudden stretching. The pain is initially severe and can be associated with a
    “popping” sensation. Immediate swelling over the area of injury often occurs as the injured
    blood vessels leak fluid into the local tissue.

How did I get this?

  • This typically occurs when the ankle is suddenly “twisted” in a sports activity or by stepping off an uneven surface.

What can I do about it?

  • Ice packs.
  • Rest – Limiting the amount of walking and weight bearing on the injured ankle.
  • Elevate to reduce swelling.
  • Apply compression bandage.

What help can I get for this?

  • Seek the advice of a podiatrist for further assessment and strapping, bracing or immobilisation.
  • In case of severe injuries you may need immobilization in a cam walker.
  • Orthopedic surgery if there is complete tear.

When will it get better?

    • Recovery depends on the severity of the injury.
    • For minor injuries, people can usually return to normal activities within several days.
    • For very severe sprains it may take longer, possibly up to several weeks.

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