Tag Archives: runners

Severs Disease

Summary

  • Severs Disease is a painful inflammation of the heel’s growth plate. It typically affects children between the ages of 8 to 14 years old, because the heel bone is not fully developed until at least age 14. When there is too much repetitive stress on the growth plate, inflammation can develop. Symptoms include pain in the back or bottom of the heel, limping, walking on toes, and difficulty running or jumping.

How did I get this?

  • Overuse and stress on the heel bone through participation in sports is a major cause. The heel’s growth plate is sensitive to repeated running and pounding on hard surfaces, resulting in muscle strain and inflamed tissue. For this reason, children and adolescents involved in soccer/football, running, or basketball are especially vulnerable.

What can I do about it?

  • Rest.
  • Ice pack application.
  • Calf and hamstring stretches.
  • See a podiatrist.

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist will confirm the diagnosis and advise appropriate shoes, exercises, and orthotics.

When will it get better?

  • Use of orthotics and supportive footwear usually provide relief within a few weeks.
  • The condition is self-limiting. Once the growth plate has closed the condition will resolve.

12

Plantar Fasciitis

Summary

  • An overuse injury that affects the sole of the foot. Symptoms include severe pain in the heel after the first few steps out of bed in the morning, or when standing up after sitting for long periods of time. Pain subsides while walking, but returns after spending long periods of time on your feet.

How did I get this?

  • Low arched foot, abnormal strain caused by long hours on the feet, unsupportive shoes, and obesity are factors in developing this condition. Other causes include an underlying inflammatory condition, bone disease, infection, stress fracture, and nerve entrapment.

What can I do about it?

  • Rest.
  • Ice application and massage with a golf ball.
  • Calf Stretches.
  • Wear supportive footwear.
  • Avoid going barefoot.
  • Short term use of pain killers can relieve the pain.

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist may prescribe padding and strapping to soften the impact of walking, support the foot and reduce strain on the fascia. This may be followed by orthotic devices to correct underlying structural abnormalities. Dry needling, foot mobilisation and extracorporeal shockwave therapy have been found to be effective.
  • Podiatrist may prescribe a night splint to maintain an extended stretch of the plantar fascia while sleeping, reducing the morning pain experienced by some patients.
  • If after several months of non-surgical treatment you continue to have heel pain, surgery may be considered.

When will it get better?

  • No matter what kind of treatment you undergo for plantar fasciitis, the underlying causes that led to this condition may remain. Therefore, you will need to continue with preventive measures. Wearing supportive shoes, stretching, and using custom orthotic devices are the mainstay of long-term treatment for plantar fasciitis.

Nerve entrapment – Neuroma

Summary

  • Nerve entrapment – Neuroma is caused by thickening of the tissue that surrounds the nerve leading to the toes. Burning pain in the ball of the foot that may goes into the toes which generally intensifies with activity or wearing shoes. There may also be numbness or an unpleasant feeling in the toes.

How did I get this?

  • Anything that causes compression or irritation of the nerve can lead to the development of a neuroma (e.g. wearing high heeled or tight shoes). Foot deformities are risk factors. Injury and trauma to the feet can also lead to this condition.

What can I do about it?

  • Placing an icepack on the affected area helps reduce swelling.
  • Activities that put repetitive pressure on the neuroma should be avoided until the condition improves.
  • Wear shoes with a wide toe box and avoid narrow-toed shoes or shoes with high heels.
  • Padding techniques provide support lessening the pressure on the nerve and decreasing the compression when walking.

What help can I get for this?

    • Podiatry consultation for treatments that include footwear advice, padding, orthotics, and may advise guided injections for alleviating the pain.
    • Surgery may be considered if not responded adequately to non-surgical treatments.

When will it get better?

  • Appropriate treatment can provide swift relief, but you will still need to consider long-term measures to help keep your symptoms from returning.

Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome – Shin Splints

Summary

  • An overuse injury to the legs known as shin splints. Occurs most commonly in runners or aggressive walkers. This injury causes pain in the front of the outer leg below the knee. Pain is often noted at the early portion of the workout, then lessens, only to reappear near the end of the training session. Discomfort is often described as dull at first. However, with continuing trauma, the pain can become so extreme as to cause the athlete to stop workouts altogether.

How did I get this?

  • Sudden increase in distance or intensity of a workout schedule.
  • Tight Achilles tendon or weak ankle muscles are risk factors to develop this condition.

What can I do about it?

  • Rest from activity that causes the pain.
  • Application of ice packs reduces inflammation.
  • Gentle stretching exercises.
  • Properly fitted shoes.
  • A Neoprene calf sleeve help to reduce discomfort after training.
  • Calf support stocking (Shin Splint compression sleeve).
  • Heat applied to the shins may help particularly in the warm up phase prior to starting a workout.

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist for footwear advice and orthotics, stretching/strengthening
  • Possible surgical option if conservative treatment does not work.

When will it get better?

  • In the vast majority of cases, the conservative treatments are sufficient to resolve the symptoms and allow a return to activity. However, there is always a risk of recurrence if your training programme is incorrect.

4

Jones Fracture

Summary

  • The Jones fracture is a fairly common fracture of the fifth metatarsal (The long bone connecting your little toe to the rest of the foot).
  • Jones fractures sometimes disrupt blood supply and can result in the permanent failure of a bone to heal.
  • Symptoms include pain, swelling, bruising, severe and pain while walking.

How did I get this?

  • Overuse, repetitive stress, and trauma are the leading causes of Jones fractures. Jones fracture is attributed to a twisting inversion injury to the foot. Inversion injuries happen when the foot or ankle twists inward.

What can I do about it?

  • Rest and stay off the injured foot (walking may cause further injury).
  • Apply an ice pack to the injured area, placing a thin towel between the ice and the skin. Use ice for 20 minutes and then wait at least 40 minutes before icing again.
  • An elastic wrap should be used to control swelling.
  • Elevation of foot should slightly above the level of your heart to reduce swelling.
  • Seek podiatry consultation.

What help can I get for this?

  • Podiatrist may consider immobilization in a cam walker depending on the severity of the injury (crutches may also be needed to avoid placing weight on the injured foot).
  • Foot and ankle surgeon for surgical approach if the injury involves a displaced bone, multiple breaks, or has failed to adequately heal.

When will it get better?

  • In most cases, rehabilitation can begin once the cast is removed, and you will gradually be able to resume your normal activities. Rehabilitation may take an additional two to three weeks. Your age may also play a role in healing time. Younger people are known to heal faster from bone injuries.

2